Hawk I m Your Brother A Caldecott Honor Book An Ala Notable Book

  • Title: Hawk, I'm Your Brother
  • Author: Byrd Baylor
  • ISBN: 9780689711022
  • Page: 169
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Caldecott Honor Book An Ala Notable Book

    • Unlimited [History Book] ð Hawk, I'm Your Brother - by Byrd Baylor Ò
      169 Byrd Baylor
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [History Book] ð Hawk, I'm Your Brother - by Byrd Baylor Ò
      Posted by:Byrd Baylor
      Published :2019-05-26T07:36:56+00:00

    About “Byrd Baylor

    1. Byrd Baylor says:

      Byrd Baylor has always lived in the Southwest, mainly in Southern Arizona near the Mexican border She is at home with the southwestern desert cliffs and mesas, rocks and open skies She is comforted by desert storms The Tohono O odham people, previously known as the Papagos, are her neighbors and close friends She has focused many of her writings on the region s landscape, peoples, and values Through her books of rhythmic prose poetry, written primarily for children, she celebrates the beauty of nature and her own feelings of rapport with it Byrd has written many books for children Her books have been honored with many prestigious children s book awards, including the Caldecott Award and the Texas Bluebonnet Award All of her books are full of the places and the peoples that she knows She thinks of these books as her own kind of private love songs to the place she calls home.



    2 thoughts on “Hawk, I'm Your Brother

    1. In Baylor's book, A young Native American boys wants to fly. He asks everyone in his town if they know how to fly, but they all laugh at him, so he stops asking. When he is up on the side of Santos Mountain, he steals a baby hawk from it's nest and keeps it as his own. Rudy thinks that the hawk will share some of his magic and they will both be able to fly. After seeing that the hawk is not happy living with Rudy and tied to a string, unable to fly in the sky, Rudy takes the hawk back to Santos [...]

    2. • 1977 Caldecott Honor Book •I thought this was ok. The art is decent, but the human faces are a little creepy. I'm not a big poetry fan and this felt sort of long, and I had a hard time getting into the story. Materials used: unlistedTypeface used: unlisted

    3. Yeah, because we all keep our siblings in cages.It's kind of unusual for a Byrd Baylor book in that there's actually a storyline. It's a prose poem about a boy who really wants to fly, so he captures a baby hawk and raises it in a cage for a season. The hawk clearly wants out the whole time, and then he sets the hawk free at the end.It really doesn't need to be a Native American story. It kind of makes me think a little bit of "My Side of the Mountain", except apparently this kid fails at raisin [...]

    4. Caldecott Honor picture book. A bit more words than typical. Boy feels affinity for birds so steals a young hawk out of nest. It could have ended up much worse, and probably should have. Text more like poetry but still typical. Relatively simple but beautiful art.

    5. the story consists on a young boy by the name of Rudy Soto that is eager to learn how to fly. He finds himself always questioning why he can't fly. He says if adults fly around, why children sleep? and even capturing a hawk to study how it is you do fly. Rudy Soto finds a connection to this captured Hawk which gives the book its name; for he wants to fly just as bad as this Hawk does. Rudy decides to release the bird resulting in a connection being made between the boy and the bird. They call ba [...]

    6. Genre: FictionFormat: Picture BookAward: Caldecott Honor BookSummary: Rudy Soto is a young boy eager to learn to fly. He finds himself always questioning why he can't fly, if adults fly around why children sleep, and even capturing an eagle to study how it is you do fly. Rudy Soto finds a connection to this captured eagle for he wants to fly just as bad as this eagle does. Rudy decides to release the bird resulting in a connection being made between the boy and the bird. They call back and forth [...]

    7. This book was not what I expected it to be when I picked it out. I did not think I would get so much information about the importance and reasoning behind protecting wild life. I don't this is a topic children are exposed enough to, and I enjoyed reading a book that would allow for children to learn a little while getting the satisfaction of reading a book. I like that this story tells us of a place many of us aren't familiar with, that is, the Santos Mountain. This book really shows how close w [...]

    8. This heartfelt story is about a young Native American boy who longs for the ability to fly. He doesn't want to just fly like any bird, but a hawk that can glide smoother than any other bird in the word. The boy, Rudy, yearned so much to have a connection with birds that he decides to take a baby hawk from it's nest in the Santos Mountains. Rudy is so excited to have this hawk and he hopes they can be brothers. The birds lives in a nest that blocks him from flying high up in the sky. Despite all [...]

    9. Logan liked it, but not as much as I did. It's about a boy who wishes he could fly, who thinks of the hawk as his brother. He captures a young hawk and eventually realizes that the hawk cannot be happy as a pet. The illustrations aren't very inspiring. I can think of many illustrators who would have captured Logan's fancy more. Byrd Baylor has a gift for conveying the intensity of a child's longings. In Amigo (my favorite of hers), she conveyed it with humor. Here, she conveys it differently: -- [...]

    10. Rudy Soto is a young boy who loves flying. He longs to fly as the hawks he sees in the mountains. Rudy captures a baby hawk from the top of the mountains and takes it as his own. He keeps the hawk in a cage with a string tied around it so he does not escape from him. Rudy knows the hawk is unhappy, but waits until the end of summer to release him. As the hawk is learning to fly, Rudy feels as if he is learning too. He also has gained a brother. Rudy feels he has a special knowledge of flying bec [...]

    11. The picture book, Hawk, I'm Your Brother, by Byrd Baylor was an interesting depiction of a boy named, Rudy Soto. Rudy Soto has always had the dream of flying. He steals a hawk from Santos Mountain thinking that if he becomes this birds brother he too will be able to learn how to fly. Rudy soon finds out that this is not possible, but he learns many things about himself when deciding to free his red- tail hawk. I liked the illustrations by Peter Parnall; he uses sketch- like drawings to depict th [...]

    12. Rudy Soto, the young boy in the story, has always wanted to fly. It is all he ever thinks about. One day, Rudy finds a baby hawk sitting by itself in a nest and decides to take it and raise it himself. He takes the hawk home and nurtures it into a strong adult hawk. However, to keep the hawk from flying away, he ties a string to the hawk and hold the string tight. However, even though the hawk loves being with Rudy, he yearns to fly and soar with the other hawks like him. Rudy decides then one d [...]

    13. "Hawk, I'm Your Brother" written by Byrd Baylor and illustrated by Peter Parnall is a picture book for older readers about a young boy named Rudy Soto who is desperate to learn to fly like he sees hawks doing. He wants so badly to learn how to fly that one day he climbs up to a nest at the top of Santos Mountain and takes a newborn Redhawk before it has learned to fly. Rudy keeps the hawk in a cage with his foot tied to a string as it grows up and takes him out often to venture around the desert [...]

    14. Hawk, I'm Your Brother is about Rudy Soto. A boy who believes he was meant to fly. He loves hawks and dreams of flying in the sky with them one day. One day he sees a baby hawk in a nest on Santos Mountain. He decides to go get the bird and keep him. However, everyday the hawk tries to get away and fly. This continues throughout the summer months. Rudy finally realizes he can't keep the hawk from flying freely any longer. The hawk was meant to fly and Rudy set it free. The hawk finally learned h [...]

    15. I really do not know what I think about this book. This book is about a young boy named Rudy Soto who all his life has wanted to fly. He even takes a young hawk from his nest and raises him so that he can maybe learn to fly with the hawk. The hawk though soon grows tired of his cage and string and wants to spread his wings and fly. Sotto does not want to let him go but he eventually realizes its for the best, and he sees that he and the hawk are now brothers. This book really speaks to the imagi [...]

    16. Hawk, I'm Your Brother is about Rudy Soto. This is a boy who really believes he was meant to fly. He loves hawks and dreams of flying in the sky with them one day. One day he sees a baby hawk in a nest on a Mountain. He decides to go get the bird and keep him. But, everyday the hawk tries to get away and fly. This continues throughout the summer. Rudy finally realizes he can't keep the hawk from flying freely any longer. The hawk was meant to fly so Rudy had to set it free. The hawk finally lear [...]

    17. Hawk, I am your Brother is about Rudy Soto, a boy who dreams of flying. After years of failure, Rudy decides to kidnap a hawk to discover the secret of flying. When the hawk continues to struggle and reach for the sky Rudy decides to set him free. When this happens and the hawk first flies Rudy finds the connection with the hawk he was looking for. Through this Rudy learns that you can fly with your feet on the ground. Rudy flies through the hawk that is now his brother. The text is presented in [...]

    18. Rudy is a young Native American boy who has had a yearning to fly for quite some time. He wants to he able to soar in the sky just like a hawk does. Rudy found a baby hawk in a nest and decided to take it. After a while, even though the hawk really enjoyed being with Rudy, he wanted to return to the sky. Rudy took him back to his home where the hawk took the sky and soared away.I really enjoyed this book. I think it is a great multicultural book that many students would enjoy reading. Many kids [...]

    19. 1977 Caldecott Honor: favorite illustration - when the hawk is finally able to fly from the cliffs of the Santos Mountain.This is the third of Baylor's poetry books about Native Americans to be honored for a Caldecott medal. This one is different, in that it tells the story of a young boy who wants to learn to fly. In his quest to become a brother to the hawk, he steals a nestling to raise as his own. Eventually, the boy learns that the hawk must fly free, but the bond they share remains.I wasn' [...]

    20. This Caldecott winner is about a boy and his longing to be able to fly. After finding a hawk in a nest, Rudy Soto decides to keep it and raise it as his own. He thinks that he'll be able to learn how to fly from the hawk, but soon realizes that this isn't possible. Rudy let's the hawk go because he realizes that the hawks happiness is just as important as his own. Even though I enjoyed the story and its concept, I think that it kind of dragged on and could have been shorter. Younger students may [...]

    21. Rudy Soto was born yearning to fly. He watches the hawks fly over the land and awaits that day that he too will fly (for despite that everyone tells him that people don't fly, Rudy is determined that one day he will). One day, Rudy spies a baby hawk in a nest and takes it home. That hawk is not happy living in capitivity, unable to fly and be free. But Rudy holds out until the end of summer, thinking that the hawk will change its mind. Hawk doesn't so Rudy does what he knows in his heart is righ [...]

    22. Normally I love Byrd Baylor books but this one was the exception. I just thought the poem went on for way too long that the story started to drag. Thankfully Peter Parnall’s incredibly detailed illustrations saved the book from being a total failure, with the possible exception of his far away drawings of the boy, as it makes him look like an alien. The poem is the story of Rudy, a Native American boy who wants to fly like the hawks he sees near the mountain. In order to get closer to his goal [...]

    23. I thought this book was okay. It is about a boy named Rudy Soto who wishes he could fly so badly. He asked many people if they could all fly and they said no. He wants to be a hawk so badly and believes he is a hawk's brother so he steals a hawk and puts it in a cage. The hawk just wants to go be with the other hawks again. The boy takes the hawk outside trying to make him happy and lets the hawk feel the water. The boy knows the hawk is not really happy though because the hawk just wants to fly [...]

    24. This story is about Rudy Soto - a boy who spends his whole life dreaming about flying. All of the grown-ups around him tell him constantly that people don't fly. Rudy thinks that if he becomes a brother to a hawk, he'll somehow learn the magic of flying. Rudy steals a baby hawk and tries to be a brother to it. But the bird is miserable and Rudy finally realizes that he has to free the bird. It's kind of sad, but as the hawk flies away, it calls back to Rudy and Rudy is able to fly vicariously th [...]

    25. The illustrations in this book bored me, and the story was weird. Was it about believing in your dreams? Or about protecting wildlife? Or about setting free what we love? I can imagine kids having a hard time connecting with a book like this. I really didn’t like it, and it took a lot for me to actually get through to the ending.

    26. I like the sketches, but I think they could be much better with some color. I can see that Parnall is using the lack of color to make a statement about the setting, but I've been in similar settings and the colors are amazing. I especially missed color on the pages that talked about the sky. Also, why does this boy think it is okay to capture a wild hawk and keep it penned up?

    27. This nature-themed story of an 11-year old Native American boy who has always dreamed of becoming a bird and flying incorporates poem-like stanzas in its portrayal of the relationship between Rudy Soto and the hawk he uncharacteristically captures. The illustrations by Peter Parnall are beautifully detailed yet simplistic black line drawings of Rudy, the Hawk and the mountainous desert landscape.

    28. As usual, this book has great illustrations. However, I found myself at odds with the major theme, which seems to be "It's neat to hold a wild animal captive." Only once does the author raise the point that this little boy's actions might not be in the best interest of the hawk. Remember Elmyra from Tiny Toons? It's like that.

    29. 2.75 StarsI absolutely love the message of this book! The picturese nice pencil drawings but just don't do it for me. The format of words is likethis. Puttingthe wordslong waydown thepage.Which would be fine if it helped you read it, or it rhymed or if there was a rhyme or reason to do it that way lots if white space on the page.

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