The Transcendence of the Ego An Existentialist Theory of Consciousness First published in France in this important essay marked a turning point in Sartre s philosophical development Before writing it he had been closely allied with phenomenologists such as Husserl

  • Title: The Transcendence of the Ego: An Existentialist Theory of Consciousness
  • Author: Jean-Paul Sartre Forrest Williams Robert Kirkpatrick
  • ISBN: 9780809015450
  • Page: 253
  • Format: Paperback
  • First published in France in 1937, this important essay marked a turning point in Sartre s philosophical development Before writing it, he had been closely allied with phenomenologists such as Husserl and Heidegger Here, however, Sartre attacked Husserl s notion of a transcendental ego The break with Husserl, in turn, facilitated Sartre s transition from phenomenology tFirst published in France in 1937, this important essay marked a turning point in Sartre s philosophical development Before writing it, he had been closely allied with phenomenologists such as Husserl and Heidegger Here, however, Sartre attacked Husserl s notion of a transcendental ego The break with Husserl, in turn, facilitated Sartre s transition from phenomenology to the existentialist doctrines of his masterwork, Being and Nothingness, which was completed a few years later while the author was a prisoner of war.This student friendly edition of The Transcendence of the Ego also includes an introduction and notes annotations by the translators.

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    About “Jean-Paul Sartre Forrest Williams Robert Kirkpatrick

    1. Jean-Paul Sartre Forrest Williams Robert Kirkpatrick says:

      Jean Paul Charles Aymard Sartre, normally known simply as Jean Paul Sartre, was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic He was a leading figure in 20th century French philosophy.He declined the award of the 1964 Nobel Prize in Literature for his work which, rich in ideas and filled with the spirit of freedom and the quest for truth, has exerted a far reaching influence on our age In the years around the time of his death, however, existentialism declined in French philosophy and was overtaken by structuralism, represented by Levi Strauss and, one of Sartre s detractors, Michel Foucault.



    2 thoughts on “The Transcendence of the Ego: An Existentialist Theory of Consciousness

    1. Sarte language was so difficult to me, I think it's deeper than my knowledge. Also this boom is very important for knowing Ego. Must read.

    2. Definitely a book that shows that Sartre owes a debt to Husserl, Descartes, and Kant. It is intended to show how he carves out a place for the active unity of the ego, but that underlying its synthetic unity is absolute nothingness. He even says, foreshadowing Being and Nothingness that once the ego begins to consciously reflect inward upon itself the mind realizes that the 'me' (or the self beyond the mere ego as it is represented) comes ex nihilo, or exists out of nothing. To me that is the mo [...]

    3. Sartre's take on the consciousness as purely spontaneous and without any trace of I or I-concept is suspiciously similar to some of the Buddhist rendering of consciousness: the ego as the transcendent unity of all psychic states and actions "constructed" by the reflecting consciousness and located only in the reflected consciousness; sth outside the pure spontaneous autonomic consciousness. Nevertheless, Sartre's theory of the ego is one step further than Husserl's transcendental ego and the for [...]

    4. I first read this book in a hipster haze in the FSU Honors Dorm. I gained nothing from it but a smug sense of satisfaction as I glanced at it on my bookshelf, taunting me. I did not understand it. I do not understand Sartre. There, I said it. A fitting admission the day I realized I have been out of college for longer than I was in college - tear. Need to try it again.

    5. Sartre utilizes the tenets of phenomenology (primarily intentionality of consciousness) to reveal the fictional nature of the I within experience. According to Sartre, the ego or I is "given through reflective consciousness" (51), as a modification of the spontaneous consciousness of the Erlebnis. In the end, this 'radical' thought of Sartre's impersonal consciousness embedded in the world seems not so different from the lifeworld of the late Husserl and of Merleau-Ponty. But maybe I just haven' [...]

    6. Σημαντικό βιβλίο για την αντίληψη απόψεων και θεωριών που αφορούν το "εγώ" μας. Ακόμα και να κάποια στοιχεία του ξεπερνούν τυχόν προσδοκίες ή υπάρχουν για να καλύπτουν τα κενά στη γνώση, ο Σαρτρ επιτίθεται σε όλους και σε ολα. Διαμορφώνει άποψη για το θέμα, δημιουργεί καταστ [...]

    7. في داخل كل نفس مغاور واتجاهات قد تشعر بها وقد تحدث في اللاشعور ، قد ترغب وقد تمتنع ، قد تعطي نفسك بتعالي لأنك موجود وقد تكسبها العدم بلا وعي .هل الوعي متأمل تشعر به ، هل هو موجود في الذات أم في الفكر ؟!هل أنا مجرد رغبات تتمثل في الذات على شكل وجود ، أو على شكل فكره ، أوعلى شكل آخر [...]

    8. Don't let the length of this book trick you, it's anything but a light read or overview or Sartre's philosophy (unlike Existentialism is a Humanism for example). I vividly remember spending about an hour on 5-7 pages of this work, only really taking in a minor dose of information in that stretch of time.The main crux of this book is Sartre's rejection of the then dominant psychology, Freud's ego psychology, which sought to split the mind or the 'Unconscious' into parts (the famous ID, Ego and Su [...]

    9. I really enjoy this little book. I am drawn to the central thesis of pre-personal consciousness discovering/creating an 'I.' Next task: See if I can figure out if that thesis is true.

    10. I'd like to say I could follow everything Sartre is offering in this work, but I'd be lying! This suggests to me that that I should read some Husserl now, so I'm thankful in this regard that I have read Transcendence - it has prompted me to expand my understanding of phenomenology and consciousness in general. This will definitely be something I refer back to once I have become more enlightened as to the subject matter in general. With that said, I do not suggest that reading Transcendence was a [...]

    11. Sartre's break with phenomenology in Transcendence of The Ego illuminates the larger and more important themes in Being and Nothingness. Especially profound is his focus on the mind being one, undivided unit that experiences and understands the world. This essay is important for understanding Sartre's later work. However, philosophical issues aside (which would take much more space and time to properly go through), this essay is not particularly engaging and is at points hard to follow. Recommen [...]

    12. I don't know why I read this all the way to the end. All I proved to myself is that I don't care whether things really exist or not. I also found that I don't believe that philosophers should ever use the terms "obviously" or "it follows that" because no, they don't necessarily follow at all. Whether anything objectively exists or not might be important if I didn't actually have to live in the world, but I think in reality, if I thought about that all of the time, I would get sick.

    13. L'abbrivo della filosofia di Sartre è una critica della fenomenologia husserliana approntata (negli stessi anni in cui sappiamo Lévinas al lavoro sulla ridefinizione del concetto di "essere") per fare breccia nell'esistenzialismo attraverso la proposta di una rinnovata egologia che assuma il concetto-oggetto di "Ego" alla sua base.

    14. This book was a little over my head. Also, Sartre has the annoying habit of using "obviously" or "clearly" in lieu of a more lucid explanation. Maybe some of the ideas he explores are "obvious" to other philosophers and maybe they're the intended audience of this book, but I felt the explanations were a little thin at points.

    15. It's interesting to me that Sartre comes to a similar conclusion about the lack of subject/object duality in consciousness as Hindu thought, wherein samadhi grants this experience. In the meditative tradition, it's a mystical experience, the result of accomplished meditation; in Sartre, it's the search for a phemenologically-based formulation of the ego.

    16. Amazing book, though not for the light philosophy reader. Definitely need a little Kant and Descartes and Husserl under your belt. I struggled through this in my undergrad, but re-read a few months ago with little effort.

    17. I loved this book. Sartre's explanation of non-positional consciousness really challenged my thought that inherent in every conscious act is an "I", which synthesizes and processes phenomenal information. I think this could be applied to Eastern philosophy quite easily.

    18. I have a lot of thoughts on this book, and would like to write a response that would seek to describe the way improvisation relates to "action" in the existentialist tradition. As soon as I get my thoughts straight on this subject, I'll post the writing on my blog.

    19. difficult read, far too technical for me at this point. main takeaway was distinguishing your observing self from your doing self. the difference between reading a book and picturing yourself reading a book.

    20. current "externalist" position in the philosophy of mind doesn't mention sartre much, but this continental philosopher's perspective makes better readings than his anglo-american analytic counterparts.

    21. As much as it pains me to admit it, this one was over my head. I trudged through over half of it but finally decided that the little bit I was getting wasn't worth the effort of continuing. Hopefully, in a few years I'll be able to return to this and read it like it's a Harry Potter novel.

    22. He made a few remarkable notes in this essay. a little bit tough read, and there were some words that the editor could've explained but he/she didn't

    23. I distinctly recall tackling this book between my sophomore and junior year of college and coming to the revelation that my vocabulary wasn't nearly as large as I thought it was.

    24. Really nice argument on Husserl's Phenomenology. It seems like Sartre takes it one step forward. Worth it!

    25. Short but a difficult read. Espouses Sartre's conviction that the ego, or our sense of self, is not a constant and only appears through reflection after an event.

    26. Existentialist heavy hitter is very technical, and makes some people drink lots of black coffee and smoke unfiltered cigarettes.I find his work uplifting.

    27. yesmylord. it is rush and flow and revelation from a mysterious mind from the corner of the bad-lighted pubs

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